Category Archives: style

How Fran Lebowitz Cares for Her Clothes

“I take very good care of my clothes. When I get home, I instantly hang up my jacket. If it’s hot outside, I’ll hang it on the shower rod so that it can air out a bit before I put it away. That’s the first thing I do. Then I’ll hang up my shirt if I’m going to wear it again that night, and I change into another shirt that I just wear around the house. It’s from high school and has holes in it. I love it because it’s mine and because nobody sees me in it, ever. I put my cufflinks in their little box. I shoeshine once a week. My jeans go in the washing machine, my shirts go out (they’re starched), and my clothes that need to be dry-cleaned go to the most expensive dry-cleaner. I dry-clean as infrequently as possible—not only because it’s psychotically expensive, but also because who knows what it does to the clothes? Dry…clean. These words don’t go together. Wet clean—that is how you clean. I can’t even imagine the things they do at the drycleaner. I don’t want to know.”

Fran Lebowitz

William Gibson on Clothes

Selections from a wide-ranging interview with William Gibson about clothes.

On the popularity of American fashion in Japan:

Japan had a more radical experience of future shock than any other nation in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. They were this feudal place, locked in the past, but then they bought the whole Industrial Revolution kit from England, blew their cultural brains out with it, became the first industrialized Asian nation, tried to take over their side of the world, got nuked by the United States for their trouble, and discovered Steve McQueen! Their take on iconic menswear emerges from that matrix. Complicated!

On his interest in classic American military and workwear styles:

“Authenticity” doesn’t mean much to me. I just want “good”, in the sense of well-designed, well-constructed, long-lasting garments. My interest in military clothing stems from that. It’s not about macho, playing soldiers, anything militaristic. It’s the functionality, the design-solutions, the durability. Likewise workwear.

On how clothes used to be better:

… in 1947 a lot of American workingmen wore shirts that were better made than most people’s shirts are today. Union-made, in the United States. Better fabric, better stitching. There were work shirts that retailed for fifty cents that were closer to today’s Prada than to today’s J.Crew. Fifty cents was an actual amount of money, though. We live in an age of seriously crap mass clothing. They’ve made a science of it.

On the “gray man”:

There’s an idea called “gray man”, in the security business, that I find interesting. They teach people to dress unobtrusively. Chinos instead of combat pants, and if you really need the extra pockets, a better design conceals them. They assume, actually, that the bad guys will shoot all the guys wearing combat pants first, just to be sure. I don’t have that as a concern, but there’s something appealingly “low-drag” about gray man theory: reduced friction with one’s environment.

Man, I could listen to William Gibson talk about clothes all day. Read the whole thing.

Previously: William Gibson on Tommy Hilfiger.

Good Enough to Get Old

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“Good clothes look better when they are nearly worn out than very cheap clothes look when they are new.”

—Edward Spencer in Clothes & the Man (1901)

(Both image and quote via Put This On. And yes, I realize the image is of shoes and the quote is about clothes, but for the purposes of this juxtaposition I don’t think the distinction is important.)

Related post: “Repair Your Own Jeans.”

Repair Your Own Jeans


The white patch thing is one of Vlieseline’s many iron-on interfacings but I’m not sure which one.  More information — including a link to order a free repair kit — can be found at the Nudie Jeans website.

Jeans, like leaves in the fall, are at their most beautiful just before they disintegrate. This guy’s got the right idea:

Carl Chiara

I Have No Time for Fashion Because Fashion Has No Time for Me

I want timeless elegance. Fashion has no time. I do. I say ‘Hello lady, how can I help you?’ Fashion has no time to even ask such question, because it is constantly concerned with finding out what will come next.

Yohji Yamamoto

(Via Roberto Greco.)

Gay Talese’s Office

(Via Ted Gioia.)

Previously: “I Don’t Use Notebooks. I Use Shirt Boards” and Dressed for a Dungeon and The Species of Tailoring Is Threatened by the Outside World

Evelyn Waugh Greatly Regrets

(Via Shaun Usher.)

Related post: “Edmund Wilson Regrets…